Category: Social media


Yeah, So I Heard Blogging is Really Effective When You Post Regularly…

And from whose mouth dropped this pearly bit of wisdom? Mine own.

More than once, in fact —  in every meeting we’ve had recently with a new or potential client, since social media is a component of nearly every proposal we’ve written lately, and a part of every job we’ve landed unless it is 100% straight print.

Oh (I whine in a non-annoying way), I don’t have time to update our blog — I’m ghost-writing four other blogs every week, plus all the writing I have to do like website content, print ads, a ton of collateral, ghosting clients’ Facebook fan pages, Twitter feeds, e-newsletters, blah blah blah socialmediacakes.

Flickr/theTrial
Flickr/theTrial

But I THINK about our blog constantly. Given the choice, I’d be blogging every day because I have an opinion on everything. In theory, this blog is supposed to have some parameters that keep me within the rather elastic bounds of advertising, marketing, and media; selling stuff; how badly brands/people are selling stuff; how cleverly stuff is sold with out anyone realizing they were, in fact, sold something, or they don’t care because it was so well done; egregious marketing ploys; any time the Wall Street Journal writes about something that I find amusingly outside its purview; I think you get the picture. And did you notice I dropped the “royal we” at some point? Because this is my responsibility, like the creative direction and graphic design are Steve’s. The blog just really ties the room together, man.

So, my random attached-to-no-holiday resolution (although I could pin this onto Labor Day…) is to get back to blogging monthly for Alchemy, and start posting our clients’ news as well when we had a hand in it. Because in addition to always having something to say about someone or something, we have a lot of new work and new clients to talk about, and they deserve the attention.


Unplugged: A Fairy Tale

There once was a time when a vacation was the perfect way to take a break from one’s job, unplugging from the work realm and exploring the elusive, magical world of Time Off.

But time waits for no (wo)man, and in our industry especially – public relations and advertising – connectivity, email, and social media have cast a pall over our ability to get away. Instead, we never really unplug; we monitor, respond, react, and work to keep to our 21st-century responsibilities intact and our clients feeling that they’re getting the service for which they pay. We can’t afford for our clients’ branded social media to take a vacation, too – it’s not feasible to send an “out of office” tweet, Facebook post, or blog comment that is guaranteed to reach all followers. At best, we look like we’re ignoring our responsibilities to clients’ communities. At worst, our clients’ professional reputation (as well as our own) may be on the line while we’re catching few rays and ordering Pina Coladas at the pool bar.

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Social Media: A List of Don’ts When Speaking to a Millennial Audience

There is an indisputable fact when it comes to promoting clients on social media: You need to know your audience. More and more often, we’re finding we must tailor our efforts to address “millennials” as a serious and influential target group.

So, do you need to speak to them differently? The answer is both “yes” and “no.”

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Watch How I Get Facebook Stats, Selena Gomez, and Man Buns into a Post About the Ad Industry…

So.

Some relatively interesting figures and facts came out over the last week that are of some interest to people whose livelihood is based on advertising creativity and what’s going in our industry of spastic identifiers – some examples being, “New model, multidisciplinary marketing communications firm; creative and strategic boutique; full-service advertising business; fully integrated marketing agency; and (my personal oh, aren’t-we-hip fav), a disruption company.”

Snapchat logoSNAPCHAT. According to the Sunday Financial Times (you’ll need a sub to read the story), views have tripled from May to date and now total 6 billion per day. The takeaway? This messaging app is THE HOTTEST new toy – I mean tool – for marketers.  More > “Watch How I Get Facebook Stats, Selena Gomez, and Man Buns into a Post About the Ad Industry…”


A Barking Good Time on Mainstreet at Midtown: Valentine’s Paws on Parade

Paws on Parade
Paws on Parade
Be My Valentine?
Be My Valentine?

By the time the sun broke through on Saturday, there were sailors, peapods, skunks, princesses, fancy pink or red dresses, chef’s whites, Sweetheart candies, rhinestone sunglasses, heart-shaped bandannas, Victorian gowns, Argyle sweaters, a variety of hats, tutus,  and an outfit made of balloons interspersed with characters wearing nothing but collars.  More > “A Barking Good Time on Mainstreet at Midtown: Valentine’s Paws on Parade”


Redfining Glamour: The LadyLash Studios Website Debuts

The LadyLash.com home page, with slideshow of their work.
The LadyLash.com homepage, with slideshow of their work.

Sometimes a project comes along and the client says, “I trust you; be creative as possible; capture our persona.”

These are the projects that allow us to expand the boundaries, show a client in the best light possible, capture the essence of who/what they are, and then take it to a whole new level.

Mikaela and Georgio Fernandez, of LadyLash Studios, are that client. They trusted us implicitly to interpret who and what they are.

They had no website, and were doing all their online promotion through Facebook and Twitter — in fact, they’re a fascinating case of how best to utilize the tools of social marketing.

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The Burger Bros Opt for a Bit of Alchemy to Build Their Brand

Images of freshness, courtesy of photographer Barry Kinsella
Images of freshness, courtesy of photographer Barry Kinsella

Talk about a fun account. The Burger Bros — Peter and Nick Julius to their family and friends —  hired Alchemy to take its Fifties-esque logo and create a fully developed Brand Identity for its fresh-food franchise.

Humor works for the Burger Bros.
Humor works for the Burger Bros.

We started by getting a feel for the Fifties style of the Burger Bros.’ logo, and everything else seemed to organically grow from there,” says Steve Owens, Alchemy’s Partner/Creative Director. “They’re serious about the old-fashioned freshness and quality of their food, but we felt that a sense of humor was an important part of the whole aesthetic appeal.”

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Alchemy’s Transformation of Luka Mineral Cosmetics is Complete!

Luka Mineral Cosmetics' new brand imprint
Luka Mineral Cosmetics’ new brand imprint

Once the team decided on a logo, it was time for Alchemy to photograph all these new packages and create an e-commerce website that clearly conveyed Luka’s brand identity, and offered Katherine’s  dozens of products for sale to her regular seasonal clients here in the Palm Beaches who want to stock up back at home, plus new customers who will be finding the site through targeting marketing and social media campaigns.

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Wikipedia’s New Editorial Utility Sparks Debate

Source: Flickr
Source: Flickr

I read Jimmy Wales column today in Huffington Post about Wikipedia reducing some controls whilst  strengthening othersm asking, “Will the new, more gentle tool, be more widely used than protection was? I certainly hope so. We are always looking for ways to help responsible people join the Wikipedia movement and contribute constructively, while gently asking those who want to cause trouble to please go somewhere else.

“Faced with the choice of preventing you from editing at all, versus allowing you to edit even though you might have bad intentions, we have erred consistently for the latter — openness. The new tool, by making it a lot easier to keep bad stuff from appearing to the general public, is going to allow for a much more responsible Wikipedia that is, at the same time, a much more open Wikipedia.”

As a huge fan of Wikipedia, and someone who ecourages her teenager to augment research using Wikipedia, I think Wales is right in downplaying the changes and believing this is positive evolution. Wikipedia is a fantastic source, a challenging and gigantic job for its admin, and I have no plans to start thiking that what I’m reading there needs to be corroborated by another independent news source.  Good on them.